Cancelled TV

Whale Tooth – You Know That Band On The L.A. Complex

Taking the idea of a ‘house band’ to a whole new level is the band Whale Tooth, which provides the diegetic or source music heard at the ‘Lux Motel on The L.A. Complex.LA Complex on The CW

The Toronto-based band describes their music as dance/pop/rock, which probably characterizes just about any other band heard on The CW, but unlike most of the other bands whose music is used to fill a montage or set the mood for a scene, Whale Tooth‘s presence is different.

Whale Tooth Creates More Than The Soundtrack

The show uses the band like another character, which works to further develop the peripheral world of The L.A Complex. Their music wasn’t just added in post production for the sake of the viewers. Instead, the members of the band ‘live’ in the fictional motel complex and provide the soundtrack for the seemingly nightly parties or the daytime ambiance for their neighbors, which mostly consist of out-of-work actors and other Hollywood hopefuls of the sorts.The LA Complex

Considering their perpetual presence at The ‘Lux, its fair to say that the fictional incarnation of Whale Tooth probably doesn’t book too many gigs of their own. Perhaps more than anyone else in the motel, they epitomize the warped homeostasis that Los Angeles creates.

Everyone living at The ‘Lux is stuck in this limbo – unable to quit on a dream while simultaneously failing to succeed. But they remain there because they love what they do. And this seems most obvious with Whale Tooth. Their only listeners may be their neighbors, but they still get to perform for an audience and that seems to be enough of a reason to keep playing.

However, in season two you’ll notice that another Canadian band, The Rural Alberta Advantage, has since moved into The ‘Lux. Apparently there is only room for one house band. So whatever happened to the fictional Whale Tooth, do you think they signed a record deal and are making a name for themselves or simply packed it up and moved on? I’d like to believe that they’re still doing what they love (and getting paid for it), but as we all know, in the world of The L.A. Complex, dreams are generally out of reach.

As for the real Whale Tooth and The Rural Alberta Advantage, well I hope they find their audience. Each week I tune into The L.A. Complex, not just to see what’s going on with Conner, Nick, Abby, and Raquel but also to hear what what’s playing at The ‘Lux.

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Just One Episode Of House Left And Its Probably Not Lupus

After 8 seasons and and 177 episodes, House is slated to air its last-ever new episode this Monday at 9pm on FOX.

Part of me is like ‘Hooray!’, after all, it seems as if the series has really run out of steam and new diseases to diagnose. But as a fan of the series, I’ve run the gamut from casual viewer to obsessive viewer to bitter-ender, and at this point I’m rather invested in the endgame.House MD Cast Promo Photos

House was probably the last show I ever watched casually. Sometime in the second season I picked it up week to week and got ahold of the season 1 DVDs in order to catch up. Through seasons 4-6 I watched House obsessively. Any of my college roommates can attest to the ridiculous amount of time I spent watching the show live, on DVD, and in reruns on Bravo and the USA Network. I can still name most episodes by title and the disease in which the patient is suffering from. (When you’re in Grad School anything that isn’t course work or thesis writing is a fun and welcomed distraction.)

Even last season I watched the show live, prioritizing new episodes of House above anything else on at the same time. But this season was different, I only cared in that I wanted to know how it all ended.

Everybody Lies One Last Time

Earlier this week I read an article from the AV Club entitled What do we want from a TV finale?, which in turn really made me think about the upcoming House sendoff. Now the article was more focused on serialized shows with complex narratives, like Fringe or Lost, but it still made a few interesting observations about how viewer expectations and whether or not a series remains true to itself even in that finale hour dictate the perception of a ‘good ending’.

At its core, House has always been a procedural show, just with more sarcasm than anything airing on CSB. For a typical procedural I would be satisfied with the ‘life goes on’ ending, in which we know everyone is alright and will continue on doing what they’ve always done, just unseen on TV. The season 3 finale of Lie To Me is a great example of this – while they didn’t exactly get the chance to write a ‘series’ finale, the last episode acts well as one, but I’ve written about this before.Promo Photos House Cast

For House however, I don’t buy this scenario as a fitting ending. The character of House has never been okay on a day-to-day basis. It’s unreasonable and unsatisfactory to assume that he’ll go on working at PPTH, abusing his current team, and saving people after almost killing them a few times. House takes risks and does stupid things, he isn’t fufilled by the status-quo. Normal is not what he is looking for. After all, normal is overrated.

Some shows go out with a bang. Finales with a crazy plot twist or abrupt ending like Life on MarsThe Sopranos, or St. Elsewhere can be both mind boggling and frustrating. House has tried to employ the crazy in past season finales (hallucinations, bus crashes, more hallucinations, mental hospitals, crane crashes, and car crashes) with varying results so my fear is that this type of ending might feel more contrived than an organic result of what’s come before.

And then we have the House finale title: “Everybody Dies”. I’m not taking this literally of course, House is not Lost but the show has long debated about the afterlife and deals with death on a weekly basis. House himself has either almost died or been clincally dead a few times. And in addition to their patients, the characters on House have lost loved ones (Foreman’s mom, Thirteen’s brother, Chase’s dad, House’s dad) as well as coworkers like Kutner and Amber. Thirteen herself is dying and Wilson, as of a few episodes ago, is too. It’s evident why FOX has never promoted House as the feel-good show of the week.

Given the current story line its not unbelievable to assume that it is Wilson who meets his demise in the finale, but where does that leave House? He admitted out loud that he needs Wilson in his life and that would certainly leave the show on a somber note. Would David Shore really create a finale in which the main character is more tormented than when we first met him? Although its perhaps inline with the morose tone that perpetually fuels the series, I don’t know if that is the finale I want to see.

I suppose in the case of House its difficult for me to resolve my conflicting feelings of wanting to see all of the characters be okay with my knowledge of the House-verse and understanding that the finale episode is not entitled “Everybody’s Okay” for a reason.

So House fans out there, what do you hope or expect to see on Monday night’s finale? Are you looking for House to find happiness, go out with a bang, deal with death, or are you one of those fans still secretly hopping to see Cuddy again?

 

*It was Lupus once, episode 8 of season 4, “You Don’t Want To Know”. 

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Happy 15th Anniversary Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Buffy the Vampire Slayer debuted on March 10th 1997, although if you’re reading this post there is a good chance you already know that. Slated as a mid-season replacement for the start-up network, The WB aired the two-part series premier “Welcome to the Hellmouth” and “The Harvest” back to back. My parents caught both episodes and thought my brother and I might like it – I don’t think it ever dawned on them that I would like it so much.Buffy Anniversary 3-10-2012

At the time I was only 11 and had a 9pm bedtime so I didn’t typically get to watch anything after 7th Heaven but the following week my parents let us stay up to watch Buffy’s third episode “The Witch”. The show quickly became a family favorite and an exception to our 9pm bedtime rule.

While everyone in my family considered themselves a fan and the show remained appointment viewing for all seven seasons, it became clear around the 4th and 5th seasons that I was way more invested than my family or even friends for that matter. So when I say “Happy 15th Anniversary” to Buffy the Vampire Slayer I guess I really mean to say, “Thanks Joss Whedon for the last 15 years and for creating the Buffyverse”.

A Toast To Buffy The Vampire Slayer

To celebrate this occasion here’s 15 things I love about Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

1. Joss Whedon took creative chances, which led to some of the most excellent and original episodes of TV that I have ever seen. Standouts include “Hush”, a mostly dialogue free episode, “Once More With Feeling”, the musical episode, “Restless”, a dream filled episode with lots of hints about seasons to come, “The Body”, which deals with the loss of a loved one in the most uncomfortably realistic way possible, and “The Zeppo”, which gives Xander a chance to shine while the typical A-story apocalypse happens in the background.

2. The show shifts tones almost seamlessly. Laughter and tears are totally possible in the same episode. The humor in the show undercuts the serious moments, which is pretty much my approach to life on a regular basis.

3. At the end of every episode the little Mutant Enemy man crosses the screen saying “Grr Arrg”, and on very special occasions it mixes it up with a santa hat, graduation cap, or other episode related in-jokes.

4. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and many of Whedon’s other works feature villians who are truely creepy and devoted to their evil ways. The bad guys aren’t just caricatures but multi-dimensional characters that truly believe what they are doing is right or are unwaveringly committed to being evil. The Mayor is a great example b/c he takes the time to meet with the boy scouts, acts as a fatherly figure to Faith, and is a germ freak yet he’s a demon who ascends on Graduation Day.

5. Whedonverse characters grow and not just up. They mature, learn to be less selfish, and embrace responsibility. Buffy empowers another generation of girls, Xander accepts his non-superpower self, Anya chooses to become a human and fight till the end, Faith goes on her own redemptive journey, and Cordelia becomes a hero in her own right.

6. Buffy made being an outsider okay. The show teaches you that with the right group of friends you can survive anything from high school to the end of the world.

7. Just about all two-parters were action packed and insanely suspenseful. From “Welcome to the Hellmouth” and “The Harvest” to “Surprise” and “Innocence” and “Graduation Day Part 1 & 2” the week-long wait between new episodes was almost unbearable.

8. Over seven seasons Buffy and the Scooby gang celebrated several holidays, which is great to re-watch every year. Besides Buffy’s Birthday there is Christmas, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Valentine’s Day.

9. Every time I hear the theme song by Nerf Herder, I can’t help but rock out. I also love Oz’s band Dingos Ate My Baby, a.k.a Four Star Mary.

10. While I firmly believe that seasons 1-5 are better than 6 or 7 I still appreciate the way the show went out. Buffy the Vampire Slayer finished up on its own terms and in a way that seemed fitting for the series.

11. The show’s quotability: “I mock you with my monkey pants.”, “You made a bear. Undo it.”, “… bogart out the cheesy chips.”, “five by five”, “The earth is doomed.”, etc…

12. Buffy chooses Buffy over Spike or Angel. Although I’ve never really been a ‘shipper I’ve always been partial to Angel, even though there is that whole risk of Angelus returning, but either way I was happy that Buffy chose to be on because as she put she was still “cookie dough”.

13. One of the few bright spots of season four: Anya’s bunny costume and general fear of those normally cute creatures. What started out as a sight gag became a long running joke that never got old.

14. The show kicked more than demon ass. Buffy the Vampire Slayer featured strong male and female characters that everyone could look up to. Throughout middle school, high school, and even in college when I would re-watch episodes on DVD, Buffy remained a constant in my life and helped me through the good times and the bad.

15. She saved the world a lot.

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NBC Schedule Drops Community, What Now?

NBC’s been on the receiving end of a lot of questions and criticism for their upcoming mid-season TV schedule; however, this time it’s not because of some new show that looks terrible. Instead, all of the flak is coming from what’s not there – it seems that Community didn’t quite make the grade this time around.

But is Community cancelled, no!

While Community has continually been ratings-challenged, this isn’t necessarily the end. On the flip side though, it’s never a good sign when a show is unexpectedly pulled from the schedule with no established return date.Save Community Posters Jon Defreest

Besides the general anger directed towards NBC, critics and fans have primarily reacted in one of two ways: rationalizing why NBC wouldn’t actually cancel such a beloved and creative show, especially since NBC’s ratings suck in general or declare doomsday and rally the troops for a save-the-show campaign.

While I really don’t want to see Community cancelled, I’m more willing to believe that NBC’s overall disarray will ultimately save the show. Well that, and the fact that one more season gets the show closer to the magic number needed for syndication. (Although so was Arrested Development.)

Not quite convinced, the seemingly intelligent people at AV Club and Vulture have also provided a number of rational reasons why everyone should just calm down. It’s too soon to whip out the felt goatee and embrace the evil timeline.

Plus, to be honest fan campaigns only work when there are other important factors involved – like money or sponsors. And as much as I love signing online petitions, voting in SOS polls, and mailing bags of marshmallows to network executives, I’ve become a bit of a realist. You can’t just cause a ruckus and hope that sheer will power will buy you an extra season or at the very least a couple of episodes.

What Community Fans Can Learn From Other Campaigns

If you look back on other shows that have been saved or more notably failed to be saved, a not so surprising pattern emerges. Networks need to have a good incentive besides boisterous fans in order to renew a show.

Jericho fans barrage CBS with nuts – they earn just seven more episodes to wrap up its season one cliffhanger.

Rabid Roswell fans similarly utilized a mailing campaign. Bottles of Tabasco sauce were sent to The WB, which kept the show alive for two seasons before the ax fell. However, another fan campaign and a deal between Twentieth Century FOX and UPN that included Buffy the Vampire Slayer extended the life of the show into an 18-episode third season.

Veronica Mars was another UPN show constantly on the verge of cancelation, but committed fans and the creation of The CW helped the show last three seasons. Low ratings however finally triumphed over a last ditch marshmallow-mailing effort by the fans and a willingness to reboot the series by jumping ahead by the show’s creator were not enough. Although rumors of a movie continue to circulate by both Rob Thomas and Kristen Bell.

The beloved series Friday Night Lights may have went out on top and when it was ready, but for a while it looked like it was going to join the cancelled too soon club. Low ratings combined with the Writer’s Strike caused NBC to question its future. Fan campaigns that included DVD purchases, football and light bulb mailings, and donations to charities were great and all but a deal with DirecTV ultimately gave the show three more well deserved seasons.

And on the completely opposite end of the spectrum is Family Guy, which was cancelled by FOX in 2002. No fan campaigns were ever launched. The show simply found an audience in syndication on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim. Coupled with outstanding DVD sales, FOX resurrected the show in 2005 and it continues to be a staple on FOX’s Sunday Night Animation Domination block.Save Community Posters Jon Defreest

There’s plenty of other successful and failed examples out there too, like Angel and Chuck or One Tree Hill and Everwood. So while I am not trying to discourage Community fans, since I am one, I’m just trying to present a more realistic picture of how fan campaigns play into a show’s overall lifespan. Also it never hurts to let networks know that there are fans out there who want more.

So let’s enjoy the remaining few episodes Community has to air and then hope that whatever NBC has lined up for the mid-season fails terribly. But just in case, here’s the link to make your very own Community evil timeline goatee.

If you prefer to sign a petition, visit Save-Community.com. And here are more Community fan campaign ideas to run with if you’re interested in a more active approach. And lastly, if you need posters for whatever campaign idea you’ve concocted, check out these awesome non-NBC Community posters created by graphic artist Jon Defreest, two of which are pictured above.

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Smallville: Up Up and Away

After 10 seasons and 217 episodes, Smallville came to an end last night. And all I can say is, “Finally!” When I first began watching the series it was in its third season and I was in high school. A lot’s changed since then, including the quality and/or my tolerance for its terrible dialogue, ridiculous storylines, and increasingly annoying characters. But I’ve stuck with it.Smallville Cast Photo

To be honest though, most Smallville episodes were must-see TV for me. Actually, when I first started watching it, the show was on The WB on Wednesday nights right before Angel, which is kind of why I started watching it in the first place. My friend was never home when Smallville was on so I started recording it for her – but because I recorded Angel on the same tape I didn’t want to hand it over. The compromise was that she would come over and I would watch it without much mocking.

It only took a few episodes for me to be hooked though, so I marathoned the first two seasons to catch-up. I’ve since bought the first six seasons on DVD. Of course those now sit on my shelf of regret, next to Dark Angel and a Region 4 Scrubs season 1 set that I can only view on my laptop, after changing some settings.

Once I was in college Smallville moved to Thursday nights, and thankfully we usually didn’t start ‘partying’ until 9 or 10pm so I was still able to watch new episodes live. And then Smallville finally made its way to the Friday night death slot, which thankfully meant it wasn’t on during anything else and I could easily watch it or record it for later.

I even loved the show so much that when I was in Australia I made sure to go to the Supernova Pop Culture Expo, which featured guests stars like John Schneider (Clark Kent’s dad) and SummSmallville John Schneider er Glau from Firefly and Serenity. Now granted I was more excited for the Serenity screening but still, the Smallville stuff was a draw too, plus I was basically out of cash when I decided I needed to go and bought my expo and train ticket anyway.

My friend and I have even been to the ‘Daily Planet’ building. On a cross-Canada road trip we made our friends, who were driving, detour when we were in the Vancouver area to find the building they use in the show. While it didn’t have a giant spinning globe on top, the building was impressive nonetheless and its exterior was featured throughout the remaining episodes.    Daily Planet Smallville

At some point though, keeping up with the show become a chore. I used to love the characters, except Lana, and even its storylines, which were particularly strong during season openers and finales, but all that slowly vanished. I mean there was always a snarky element to my viewing, after all you can only take a character being conveniently knocked out so as not to remember seeing Clark save the day so many times. And Lana being tramped by a horse in the season three episode “Shattered” is still one of my all-time ridiculous highlights, but how long can you really enjoy spending your time on something you don’t actually like anymore?

Apparently in my case a lot, but I don’t typically give up on TV. After all, I watched all eight seasons of Charmed and watched ER until the end. What’s weird about Smallville though is that I can’t even enjoy older episodes because they are just as cringe worthy. But, if for instance I caught an older episode of ER on TNT, it was still awesome and had George Clooney.

Smallville is also different from a lot of series in that we all know how it ends. The whole point of watching a show about a young Clark Kent is getting the chance to see his journey towards becoming Superman. But when the journey takes like 10 years, you can’t blame someone for getting impatient. Storylines continually went back to Clark’s self doubt or disinterest in his destiny all while other plot lines weaved more and more convoluted back stories and mythologies, which made episodes feel like we were taking one step forward and two steps back.

But despite all its flaws and storylines resulting from meteor rocks and memory wipes I still looked forward to watching the show come to a close with my friend, who I blame for all of my lost time. And when all was said and done, Smallville ended the same way the series has always been – with some really nice moments, like Chloe living happily ever after and Michael Rosenbaum reprising his role as Lex Luther … and some equally infuriating ones, since we never really got to see a good shot of Tom Welling as Clark Kent in his Superman suit.

At least he finally learned to fly though.

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Life Unexpected Doesn’t Deliver Enough Drama (or Ratings) For The CW

The two-hour Life Unexpected finale is on tonight. Whether you want to put ‘season’ or ‘series’ in front of that sentence is up to you, but I am more than willing to bet that this is it for the little CW show that could.

Its second season pick-up last May was practically a miracle in of itself, and it’s also this year’s least watched show on network television, so you do the math. But despite being un-incredible in terms of ratings and overall storytelling, I’ve still come to enjoy this CW series about a foster kid who finally finds a home with her dysfunctional birthparents sixteen years after they gave her up for adoption.Life Unexpected

The plot is pretty standard TV stuff – an angsty teenager, an unconventional family, lots of love triangles, plenty of lies, and some forced drama, but overall it’s unlike many of its other CW siblings. On Life Unexpected the characters get by without superpowers, they don’t live on the Upper East Side or in another famous zip code, and vampires and demons don’t exist. For a television drama it’s actually rather mellow and has so far resisted the temptation to employ fantastical plotlines (although it’s only season two). Rather, Life Unexpected has a very WB vibe.

For anyone who grew up on a steady WB diet, this show evokes a pretty high nostalgia factor. Life Unexpected has a lot more in common, on a thematic level, with shows like Everwood, Charmed, Rosewell, Dawson’s Creek, Felicity, 7th Heaven, Gilmore Girls, and Jack & Bobby than say Hellcats, Gossip Girl, The Beautiful Life, The Vampire Diaries, or Nikita. Not only does Life Unexpected tackle many of the same topics as past WB shows, but it also stars Shiri Appleby, who played Liz Parker on Rosewell and Kerr Smith, who was Jack McPhee on Dawson’s Creek.

But back to its plot point similarities, many shows on The WB revolved around the family unit and how their various characters negotiated the often-complicated relationships portrayed on them.

Okay, hold up, I know you’re thinking all shows do that, but just hear me out…

Overall, most of their shows stayed grounded and presented relatable storylines of characters struggling to belong, seeking acceptance and love, or simply trying to figure out who they were. A teenager often took center stage and consequently the feeling of being an outsider was quite prevalent. In most of the shows the characters felt as if they were different from everyone else figuratively and literally depending on the show’s genre.

In Life Unexpected’s two short seasons, its storylines have encompassed all of these sentiments, perhaps even more overtly. Think about it, the show is about a girl who was given up and is now trying to figure out how she fits in to this makeshift family of hers, while starting at a new school, and running from her past. Abandonment, exclusion, parental bonds, life lessons, and a fresh start are all laid out in its premise. There’s really no need for metaphors here.

Life Unexpected and Gilmore Girls could be two sides of the same coin, the same story with two very different paths. Although Cate and Lux have an incredibly tenuous relationship, they’re working on it and like Gilmore Girls, the mother daughter relationship – at its core – helps define who they are, also both got knocked up in high school. But for example, Lorelai would not have been who she was if she hadn’t had Rory and left home. Likewise, Rory was like a changed person when her and her mom had a falling out and she left home to live with her Grandparents. The same can be said for Lux and Cate. Not only has it immediately forced Cate to grow up, but also becoming a mom has forced her to confront many of her shortcomings and insecurities. Likewise, Lux is finally learning to rely and trust others, kind of crucial life skills. Together they are better, separate they are a mess.

Like Everwood’s Ephram, Life Unexpected’s main character Lux has some series parental blame issues and even more trouble fitting in. Feeling unwanted and like an outsider she often rebels and relies on sarcasm or silence. Both shows tackle realistic and relatable journeys of a family’s road to redemption and forgiveness.

Similar to the main characters on Rosewell, Lux feels different, not unlike an alien. Growing up in foster homes and living on the streets she can’t always relate to the average teenagers she matriculates with. She also goes to great lengths to keep her past a secret. The same can be said for Clark Kent on Smallville, Buffy in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and the Halliwell sisters on Charmed.

If you’re looking for more examples I could keep going but I think you catch my drift. Although Life Unexpected certainly would have benefitted from more viewers, it also seemed like The CW’s own orphan.

This video is another reason I love the show – watch here.

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Coming Soon: Off the Map

If you were to look at a list of all the TV shows I love, or at the very least watch on a regular basis you would be able to pick up on two major trends in my viewership – 1) I have an affinity for medical shows of all kinds and 2) I’m easily entranced by dramas regardless of quality. Off the Map seems like the perfect blend of the two.

Off the Map Is On The Schedule

So for the un-addicts that happen upon this posting, Off the Map is the newest series from medical drama extraordinaire Shonda Rhimes, creator of Grey’s Anatomy and Private Practice. Although I’ve never personally seen more than an episode of either, both shows seem to attract a dedicated audience and do well in ratings – two characteristics I can feel hopeful about. I don’t regret watching shows that are quickly cancelled, many are really phenomenal, but it would certainly be nice to get involved in a show with staying power.

Not that I need a show to be good to watch, I have a lot of guilty pleasures on my TV schedule, it would be an added bonus. And from what I hear neither of her other shows jumped the shark until a few seasons in, something about ghost sex… Regardless, I’m pretty psyched for the premier and I just really hope that this isn’t the unlucky one. Do audiences really need another medical drama, probably not but hell people watch a lot of stuff I think is unnecessary and ridiculous so one can only hope.Off the Map

Another reason I intend to watch, and why I want to encourage others to do the same is because of a few of the actors involved. Off the Map stars Caroline Dhavernas from the short-lived and super awesome series Wonderfalls and Zach Gilford, former QB1 from the outstanding show Friday Night Lights. I loved both of their characters on their other series and I really do hope that these two talented actors can find success on TV so I can keep watching them do their thing.

So bring on the blood, guts, relationships, and tropical scenery, Off the Map premiers this Wednesday – January 12th on ABC at 10pm.

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Scrubs: “You know I’m hearing it now, it is kind of annoying when I talk.”

Scrubs has been really funny this season, even more so, when JD is not present. I just wanted to put that statement out there, before I get any further along, since this is where I am headed with this entry.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not anti JD and when I initially read that Scrubs was renewed for a ninth season, with a mostly new cast, I was less than thrilled. Sure Scrubs has had some great seasons and some less than great seasons, but overall I thought “My Finale Part I & II” (8.18 & 8.19) were a perfectly respectable way to go out. I wasn’t interested in a spin-off or a reboot with the same name and I wasn’t interested in seeing a new class of med students. After eight seasons I’ve gotten kind of attached to JD, Turk, Carla, Elliot, The Janitor, and Dr. Cox and I’ve also grown fond of the many colorful background characters that keep Sacred Heart Hospital so much fun to visit on a weekly basis.

Scrubs Reboot is Refreshing

So even though I had reservations, I wasn’t about to give up on Scrubs. Maybe it’s a personal weakness, but generally when I start a show—I finish it. To put that statement into perspective I watched all eight seasons of Charmed and I’m still watching Smallville on a weekly basis. Initially I was lukewarm to the new season even though the first few episodes heavily featured JD, Dr. Cox, and Turk. The changes made to the show just felt like too much too soon. I had difficultly wrapping my head around the fact that in Scrubs a few short months a new hospital / med school was built and most everyone was suddenly a professor or gone. (Yes, I understand that it’s a television show…just stay with me, I’m getting to the point.)

Surprisingly, I found myself liking the new characters and their quirks. And while there were certainly some laugh out loud moments in the first few episodes, it wasn’t until JD left that I started to really enjoy the new season.

Here is the main reason why: The character of JD walks a fine line between character and caricature. While I understand that this show is a comedy, unlike the other main characters he has been the most inconsistent in terms of growth. No, I don’t want, or expect him to stop the daydreams or tone down the bromance with Turk, but his constant need for approval and outlandish ‘real-life’ ideas just grow old after a while. What I find even more frustrating about the way his character has been written lately, is that it seems to be a regression from the level of maturity he reached last season, settling down with Elliot and choosing to leave Sacred Heard Hospital to be closer to his son.

Perhaps that is why I don’t mind the ridiculousness of the new characters. Lucy’s horse obsession has been a constant and Cole has always unnecessarily abbreviated words, but I don’t really expect anything else from them. The show is just now starting to develop the new crop of “murderers, butchers, slaughterers, and slayers” into three-dimensional characters. On the other hand, the same character that worried about being man enough for his son (7.8) and willingly postponed steak night to stay with a dying patient (8.2) also wore a hairnet rather than a helmet so as to not mess up his hairdo (3.4) and taught class from a tree (9.2).

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